Vocational Stewardship

It was in Genesis that God instituted the idea of workbefore the Fall. This means that work is intrinsically good. Because of the Fall, work will now be hard and involve thorns and thistles (Gen. 3:17-19), but we cannot forget its intended design. We must fight the temptation to allow the struggles we have had or the corruptions we have seen to redefine the meaning for work.

Topics: Work

It was in Genesis that God instituted the idea of work—before the Fall. This means that work is intrinsically good. Because of the Fall, work will now be hard and involve thorns and thistles (Gen. 3:17-19), but we cannot forget its intended design. We must fight the temptation to allow the struggles we have had or the corruptions we have seen to redefine the meaning for work.

In Wayne Grudem’s book, Business for the Glory of God, he writes, “The distortions of something good must not cause us to think that the thing itself is evil.” We, as believers, have the ability to glorify God in all aspects of work—from the way we treat our co-workers and customers to the work ethic we display.

I remember listening to a Christian business executive speak on ways he trains employees to treat customers. He spoke of manners to a generation who is losing them. He spoke of how they were beginning to implement a new customer service act at his stores, which was having employees go outside in the rain with an umbrella to walk in customers.

I sat back and wondered, “Why didn’t I think of that?” It was simple and small but to the customer it would mean the world.

As ministers of reconciliation in a broken and fallen world, we must view everything as a mission field, including our vocation. Jesus reminds us that we are not of this world (John 17:16). How are you living not like the world at your job? Do those around you know your King is the King of Kings and the Lord of Lords?

Are your eyes open to the hurt, struggle, pain, frustration, heartache, joy and excitement of your co-workers? When our eyes are open to the emotional and physical state of those around us, we can open the door to discuss the spiritual state. Our Savior cared about the physical and emotional states but never left it at that. He always pointed to a spiritual need that could only be met by God.

As believers we are called to be imitators of God (Eph. 5:1; Phil. 2:5). How are you imitating God at your work? If we look at who God is and the characteristics used to describe Him in Scripture, then we must ask ourselves if we are truly imitating Him. Do you work unto the Lord or unto man (Col. 3:23-24)? We have the unique opportunity to show Jesus to a lost world around us. We must take this call seriously.

Let us remind ourselves of our calling each day as we leave for work. May we steward our vocation well unto the Lord.