The Notorious B.I.G. and Me

I am intrigued by the story of Hip-Hop. I don’t claim to know much about it, and I certainly didn’t live it...no real surprise. When I was in high school, I listened to my fair share of Dr. Dre and Snoop. I am confident I could still recount the lyrics to a few albums. Again, I certainly didn’t live the gangsta life but somehow I liked being a part of the music.

Topics: Entertainment

I am intrigued by the story of Hip-Hop. I don’t claim to know much about it, and I certainly didn’t live itno real surprise. When I was in high school, I listened to my fair share of Dr. Dre and Snoop. I am confident I could still recount the lyrics to a few albums. Again, I certainly didn’t live the gangsta life but somehow I liked being a part of the music. I can remember several times when I was in a car with a bunch of white dudes blasting Dr. Dre...bass thumpin’ as we rolled through west Plano. It was pretty hard core as you can imagine.

As the east coast/west coast rap wars began I faded from the scene (ha). About a year ago, I had a really intriguing conversation with two guys at my house about the evolution of hip-hop, specifically gangsta rap. One guy was from the south side of Houston (LeCrae) and the other from Detroit (Adam Thomasson). To make a long story shortI learned about the genius and torment of Tupac.

When I saw that “Notorious” hit the theaters earlier in 2009, I started thinking about this againanother tormented soul. The tragedy of these two lives in particular, and so many others in general, is not that they died youngit’s that they had misplaced talents and pursuits. There is no doubt that these guys were charismatic, influential and gifted. They had a message and an audience. They were tormented men trying to work out the ache in their soul. I can identify with this. Suburbia can identify with this A broken soul is no respecter of persons.

So, I grew up in a different place under different circumstance with different gifts. But, we all share a common ache. I can identify with a broken spirit and tormented soul. For 19 years I tried to make the incessant cries of my heart stop through a variety of hedonistic pursuits, pleasures and painful regrets Jesus, in His matchless grace, opened my eyes and offered me forgiveness through His cross. Now, my misplaced priorities find significance. The ache in my heart is replaced with a new song. I lived orphaned for so long and now I am a son. He takes ashes and makes them beautiful...from notorious to glorious. Maybe there’s a rap in there somewhere.

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