Condensing Culture and Theology: Is God Green?

Last Friday night the Denton campus hosted another Culture and Theology event, this one titled “Is God Green?” The purpose of the night was to explore not only God’s concern for creation, but the consequent concern which His children should possess. I think very few of us would question God’s care for the world (and here I mean not only its inhabitants but the animals, the mountains, rivers, and fields).

Topics: Creation

Last Friday night the Denton campus hosted another Culture and Theology event, this one titled “Is God Green?”  The purpose of the night was to explore not only God’s concern for creation, but the consequent concern which His children should possess.

I think very few of us would question God’s care for the world (and here I mean not only its inhabitants but the animals, the mountains, rivers, and fields).  It should be obvious to the observer of Scripture that God created and sustains the earth (Genesis 1-2) and that He will one day fully restore the rhythm of an unblemished creation (Revelation 21-22).  It is therefore no stretch to deduce that we, created in His image with the purpose of reflecting Him, should have a similar concern.

Very few of us change the oil in our cars and pour the residue directly into the water supply.  Not many of us leave our water running for days on end, just because we can.  I doubt any of us start forest fires because we hate trees, or drive the long way to our destination in order to purposefully increase carbon emissions.  Our problem is often not one of informed and malicious rebellion against creation, but rather ignorance and/or thoughtlessness.  We often choose “convenience over conservation.”

I confess my own historical ignorance and indifference in this matter and that was really one of the reasons that I decided to attend Friday’s event.  Perhaps I would learn something, and “knowing is half the battle” as G.I. Joe taught me.

In reflecting upon the night and the material, I found a few resources and thought I would share them to help educate and equip our body.  You might not agree with everything presented, I myself do not agree with everything presented, but it should give you a good start as we desire to take seriously our role as stewards of creation.

As Christians, we do not necessarily have to vote for the greenest politician, swim with the dolphins, or chain ourselves to trees, but we do need to be mindful.  May this be a good beginning (or continuation) to thinking Christianly about creation.

Recommended Resources

The Story of Stuff

To Protect and Conserve

For a more scholarly Biblical consideration of the environment:

The Four Most Important Texts for Christian Environmentalism

BTW, our next Culture and Theology event is May 1st and will cover the topic of Racial Reconciliation.  Make plans to attend.

Related Resources

Podcast

#6 - In the Beginning

We discuss Genesis 1-2 and how it shapes a Christian doctrine of creation by its original context and distinctives from other ancient origin creation narratives.

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Should Christians Be Environmentalists?

Matt Chandler

As viceroys of God in this world, Christians should care about environmental issues, but they cannot be our main focus. First and foremost, our concern is with those who bear the image of God.

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What is the Cultural Mandate?

Andy Crouch

God has called us, as image bearers, to create culture and care for the world in the way that He would, uncovering its possibilities and bringing them to their fullness.